State Medical/Adult Use Marijuana Programs

Below is a list of states with Medical and/or Adult Use Marijuana Programs, the applicable statute(s), and specific conditions (if any) for medical use. 

 

Scroll to the bottom of the chart for more information. 

The rules and regulations for marijuana change rapidly. This chart is current as of the date I wrote it, but adjusters should be familiar with their state’s rules. I cannot guarantee the accuracy of the list. Because laws and regulations can change without notice, an attorney should be contacted if there are any questions regarding this chart. These materials are provided for informational and educational purposes only and do not constitute legal advice or legal opinions because I am not an attorney.

STATE
MEDICAL/ADULT USE/BOTH
STATUTE (YEAR)
QUALIFYING CONDITIONS
Alabama
Medical
SB46 (2021)
Yes
Alaska
Both
Measure 8 (1998); SB 94 (1999); Statute Title 17
Yes
Arizona
Both
Proposition 203 (2010)
Yes
Arkansas
Medical
Issue 6 (2016)
Yes
California
Both
Proposition 215 (1996) SB 420 (2003
N/A
Colorado
Both
Amendment 20 (2000)
Yes
Connecticut
Both
HB 5389 (2012); Non medical use legislation SB 1201 (2021)
Yes
Delaware
Medical
SB 17 (2011)
Yes
District of Columbia
Medical
Initiative 59 (Passed by voters but blocked by the Barr Amendment in 1998) L18-0210 or Act B18-622 (2010)
Yes
Florida
Medical
Amendment 2 (2016)
Yes
Georgia
Medical Limited (Yes High-CBD, low-THC oil)
HB 1 (2015) (signed by governor 4/16/15)
Yes
Hawaii
Medical
SB 862 (2000)
Yes
Idaho
N/A
SB 1146 (VETOED by governor 4/16/15)
N/A
Illinois
Both
HB 1 (2013) Eff. 2014 Rules; Non medical use legalization SB 0007 (2020)
Yes
Indiana
Medical Limited (Yes high-CBD, low-THC oil)
HB 1148 (2017)
Yes
Iowa
Medical Limited (Yes high-CBD, low-THC oil)
SF 2360 (2014), replaced by F 524 (2017) now Chapter 124E
Yes
Kansas
N/A
SB282 (2018); Senate Bill 560 (2019)
N/A
Kentucky
Medical Limited (Yes high-CBD, low-THC oil)
SB 124 (2014); HB136 (2022)
N/A
Louisiana
Medical
SB 271 (2017) (not yet in effect)
Yes
Maine
Both
Question 2 (1999) LD 611 (2002) Question 5 (2009) LD 1811 (2010) LD 1296 (2011)
Yes
Maryland
Medical
HB 702 (2003); SB 308 (2011); HB 180/SB 580 (2013); HB 1101- Chapter 403 (2013); SB 923 (2014); HB 881- similar to SB 923 Question 5 (2009); LD 1811 (2010); LD 1296 (2011)
Yes
Massachusetts
Both
Question 3 (2012) Regulations (2013)
Yes
Michigan
Both
Proposal 1 (2008)
Yes
Minnesota
Medical
SF 2471, Chapter 311 (2014)
Yes
Mississippi
Medical
Initiative 65 (2020); now SB 2095 (2022)
Yes
Missouri
Medical
Amendment 2 (2018)
Yes
Montana
Both
Initiative 148 (2004) SB 423 (2011); Initiative 182 (2016)
Yes
Nebraska
N/A
N/A
N/A
Nevada
Both
Question 9 (2000) NRS 453A NAC 453A
Yes
New Hampshire
Medical
HB 573 (2013; HB 89 (2021)
Yes
New Jersey
Both
SB 119 (2009)
Yes
New Mexico
Both
SB 523 (2007)
Yes
New York
Both
A6357 (2014)
Yes
North Carolina
Medical Limited (Yes high CBD, low Delta9-THC. Questionable if Delta8-THC is legal.)
HB 1220 (2014); revised in HB 766 (2015)
Yes
North Dakota
Medical
Measure 5 (2016) NDCC 19-24.1 NDAC 33-44
Yes
Ohio
Medical
HB 523 (2016)
Yes
Oklahoma
Medical
SQ 788 (2018)
N/A
Oregon
Both
Oregon Medical Marijuana Act (1998); SB 161 (2007)
Yes
Pennsylvania
Medical
SB 3 (2016)
Yes
Rhode Island
Medical
S 710 B (2006); SB 791 (2007); SB 185 (2009)
Yes
South Carolina
Medical
SB 1035 (2014); Bill 3361: SC Compassionate Care Act (2021-2022); S. 150
Yes
South Dakota
Medical
Initiated Measure 26 (2020); Court rules measure unconstitutional (2021
Yes
Tennessee
Medical Limited (CBD extracts, up to .9% THC)
SB 2531 (2014)
Yes
Texas
Medical Limited (CBD extracts, up to 1% THC)
SB 339 (2015); HB 3703 (2019)
Yes
Utah
Medical
HB 105 (2014); New comprehensive program (2018)
Yes
Vermont
Both (Adult use - limited)
SB 76 (2004); SB 7 (2007); SB 17 (2011); H.511 (2018)
Yes
Virginia
Both
H 1460 (2020); S 646 (2020); H 1617 (2020); S 976 (2020); Legislative Timeline (2020)
Yes
Washington
Both
Initiative 692(1998); SB 5798 (2010); SB 5073 (2011)
Yes
West Virginia
Medical
SB 386 (2017)
Yes
Wisconsin
N/A
AB 726 (2013 Act 267)
N/A
Wyoming
Medical Limited (Yes high-CBD, low-THC oil)
HB 32 (2015)
Yes

Alabama

The state allows medical marijuana for any “Chronic or debilitating disease or medical condition or the treatment of a chronic or debilitating disease or medical condition that produces one or more of the following, as documented by a physician with whom the patient has a bona fide physician-patient relationship: a. Cachexia or wasting syndrome. b. Severe or chronic pain. c. Severe nausea. d. Seizures. e. Severe and persistent muscle spasms. f. Any other condition that is severe and resistant to conventional medicine.”

Alaska

These patient conditions qualify for marijuana medical use: “Cancer, Glaucoma, positive status for human immunodeficiency virus, or acquired immune deficiency syndrome, or treatment for any of these conditions; Any chronic or debilitating disease or treatment for such diseases, which produces, for a specific patient, one or more of the following, and for which, in the professional opinion of the patient’s physician, such condition or conditions reasonably may be alleviated by the medical use of the marijuana: cachexia; severe pain; severe nausea; seizures, including those that are characteristic of epilepsy; or persistent muscle spasms, including those that are characteristic or multiple sclerosis; or any other medical condition, or treatment for such condition, approved by the department, under regulations adopted under AS17.37.060 or approval of a petition submitted under AS17.37.060.”

Arizona

The following conditions qualify for marijuana medical use: "Cancer, Glaucoma, HIV, AIDS, Hepatitis C, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Crohn's Disease, Agitation of Alzheimer's Disease; a chronic or debilitating disease or medical condition or the treatment for a chronic or debilitating disease or medical condition that produces cachexia or wasting syndrome; a chronic or debilitating disease or medical condition or the treatment for a chronic or debilitating disease or medical condition that produces severe and chronic pain; a chronic or debilitating disease or medical condition or the treatment for a chronic or debilitating disease or medical condition that produces severe nausea; a chronic or debilitating disease or medical condition or the treatment for a chronic or debilitating disease or medical; a condition that produces seizures, including those characteristic of epilepsy; a chronic or debilitating disease or medical condition or the treatment for a chronic or debilitating disease or medical condition that produces severe or persistent muscle spasms, including those characteristic of multiple sclerosis; a debilitating medical condition approved by the Department under A.R.S. § 36-2801.01 and R9-17-106; Palliative care of PTSD (not the illness itself)."

Arkansas

The qualifying patient conditions are the following: "Cancer, Glaucoma, Positive status for HIV/ acquired immune deficiency syndrome, Hepatitis C, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Tourette’s syndrome, Crohn’s disease, Ulcerative colitis, Post-traumatic stress disorder, Severe arthritis, Fibromyalgia, Alzheimer’s disease, Cachexia or wasting syndrome, Peripheral neuropathy, Intractable pain which is pain that has not responded to ordinary medications, treatment or surgical measures for more than six (6) months, Severe nausea, Seizures including without limitation those characteristic of epilepsy, Severe and persistent muscle spasms including without limitation those characteristic of multiple sclerosis, and any other medical condition or its treatment approved by the Department of Health.”

 

California

There are currently no qualifying patient conditions for medical use of marijuana in this state.

Colorado

These are the qualifying conditions followed by the state: "Cancer, Glaucoma, HIV or AIDS, Cachexia, Persistent muscle spasms, Seizures, Severe nausea, Severe pain, and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)."

Connecticut

The state observes the following patient conditions for medical marijuana: “Cancer, Glaucoma, Positive Status for Human Immunodeficiency Virus or Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, Parkinson's Disease, Multiple Sclerosis, Damage to the Nervous Tissue of the Spinal Cord with Objective Neurological Indication of Intractable Spasticity, Epilepsy, Cachexia Wasting Syndrome, Crohn's Disease, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Sickle Cell Disease, Post Laminectomy Syndrome with Chronic Radiculopathy, Severe Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Ulcerative Colitis, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, Cerebral Palsy, Cystic Fibrosis, Irreversible Spinal Cord Injury with Objective Neurological Indication of Intractable Spasticity, Terminal Illness Requiring End-Of-Life Care, Uncontrolled Intractable Seizure Disorder, Spasticity or Neuropathic Pain Associated with Fibromyalgia, Severe Rheumatoid Arthritis, Post Herpetic Neuralgia, Hydrocephalus with Intractable Headache, Intractable Headache Syndromes, Neuropathic Facial Pain, Muscular Dystrophy, Osteogenesis Imperfecta, Chronic Neuropathic Pain Associated with Degenerative Spinal Disorders”.  

For Patients Under 18, Debilitating Medical Conditions Include the following: Cerebral Palsy, Cystic Fibrosis, Irreversible Spinal Cord Injury with Objective Neurological Indication of Intractable Spasticity, Severe Epilepsy, Terminal Illness Requiring End-Of-Life Care, Uncontrolled Intractable Seizure Disorder, Muscular Dystrophy, and Osteogenesis Imperfecta.”

 

Delaware

The state follows medical marijuana use for the following patient conditions: “Cancer, Terminal Illness, Positive status for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV Positive) Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), Decompensated Cirrhosis, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS/Lou Gehrig’s Disease), Agitation of Alzheimer’s Disease, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), Autism with aggressive behavior, Glaucoma, Chronic Debilitating Migraine; A chronic or debilitating disease or medical condition or its treatment that produces one or more of the following: Cachexia or Wasting Syndrome, Severe debilitating pain that has not responded to previously prescribed medication or surgical measure for more than three months, or for which other treatment options produced serious side effects like Intractable Nausea, Seizures, Severe and persistent muscle spasms, including but not limited to those characteristics of Multiple Sclerosis.”

District of Columbia

“Any debilitating condition as recommended by a DC licensed doctor," qualifies for medical marijuana.

Florida The qualifying conditions for medical marijuana followed by the state are the following: “ALS, Cancer, Crohn’s disease, Chronic nonmalignant pain*, Epilepsy, Glaucoma, HIV/AIDS, Multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, PTSD, Seizures, Terminal illness (patients diagnosed with no more than 12-months to live), Other debilitating medical conditions comparable to those enumerated *Defined as “pain that is either caused by or originates from a qualifying medical condition.”

Georgia

The following are the qualifying conditions for medical marijuana: “AIDS, Alzheimer’s disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Autism, Cancer, Crohn’s disease, Hospice care patients, Intractable Pain, Mitochondrial disease, Multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, post-traumatic stress syndrome, Severe or end-stage Peripheral neuropathy, Seizure disorder, Sickle cell disease, and Tourette’s syndrome.”

Hawaii  

These qualifying patient conditions are allowed to use medical marijuana: “Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Cachexia, Cancer, Chronic pain, Crohn’s disease, Epilepsy, Glaucoma, HIV or AIDS, Lupus, Multiple sclerosis, Nausea, Persistent muscle spasms, Post-traumatic stress, Rheumatoid arthritis, and Seizures.”

Idaho

There are currently no rules on legality of medical marijuana in the state.

 

Illinois  

Medical marijuana is used in the following qualifying conditions: “Alzheimer’s disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Anorexia nervosa; any medical condition for which an opioid has been or could be prescribed by a physician based on generally accepted standards of care: Arnold Chiari malformation, Autism, Cachexia/wasting syndrome, Cancer, Causalgia, Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy, Chronic pain, Complex regional pain syndrome type 2, Crohn’s Disease Dystonia, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Fibromyalgia, Fibrous dysplasia, Glaucoma, Hepatitis C, HIV/AIDS, Hydrocephalus, Hydromyelia, Interstitial Cystitis, Irritable bowel syndrome, Lupus, Migraines, Multiple Sclerosis, Muscular Dystrophy, Myasthenia Gravis, Myoclonus, Nail patella syndrome, Neuro-Behcet’s autoimmune disease, Neurofibromatosis, Neuropathy, Osteoarthritis, Parkinson’s disease, Polycystic kidney disease, Post-traumatic stress, Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (RSD), Rheumatoid Arthritis, Sjogren’s syndrome, Spinal cord disease, Spinocerebellar Ataxia (SCA), Superior canal dehiscence syndrome Syringomyelia, Tarlov cysts, Tourette’s syndrome, Traumatic brain injury and post-concussion syndrome, and Ulcerative colitis.”

 

Indiana

“Treatment-resistant epileptic conditions, including Dravet syndrome and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.”

Iowa

The following patient conditions qualify for medical marijuana: “AIDS/HIV, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Autism (with self-injurous or aggressive behavior), Cancer, Cancer-related chronic pain, nausea, or cachexia, Chronic pain, Crohn’s disease, Multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, Post-traumatic stress disorder, Intractable epilepsy, Terminal illness, Ulcerative colitis and Chronic pain.”

Kansas

There are currently no rules on legality of medical marijuana in the state.

Kentucky

Nothing is defined, however, the law has three exceptions from the definition of marijuana: 1. The hemp 2. The substance cannabidiol [CBD], when transferred, dispensed, or administered pursuant to the written order of a physician practicing at a hospital or associated clinic affiliated with a Kentucky public university having a college or school of medicine; 3. For persons participating in a clinical trial or in an expanded access program, a drug or substance approved for the use of those participants by the United States Food and Drug Administration." (The above is the aforementioned 69-word cannabis law in Kentucky.)

Louisiana  

These are the medical marijuana qualifying patient conditions observed by the state: “Autism spectrum disorders, Cachexia/wasting syndrome, Cancer, Crohn’s disease, Epilepsy, Glaucoma, HIV/AIDS, Intractable pain (defined as “pain so chronic or severe as to otherwise warrant an opiate prescription”), Muscular dystrophy, Multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, Post traumatic stress disorder, Seizure disorders/spasticity, Severe muscle spasms, Any other condition not otherwise specified “that a physician, in his medical opinion, considers debilitating to an individual patient and is qualified through his medical education and training to treat” (effective 8/1/2020).

Maine

The qualifying conditions for medical marijuana followed by the state are the following: “Alzheimer’s disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Cachexia or wasting syndrome, Cancer, Chronic pain, Crohn’s disease, Epilepsy, Glaucoma, Hepatitis C, HIV or AIDS, Huntington’s disease, Inflammatory bowel disease, Multiple Sclerosis, Nausea, Nail-patella syndrome, Parkinson’s disease, Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), *Legislation (LD 1539) approved on July 9, 2018, amends the state law so that a physician at his or her sole discretion may recommend cannabis to any patient for which he/she believes it will benefit. The new law takes effect 90 days after the close of the 2018 special legislative session.”

Maryland

The state rule allows the following qualifying conditions for medical marijuana: “Cachexia, Anorexia, or Wasting Syndrome, Chronic or severe pain, Glaucoma, Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), Seizures, Severe or persistent muscle spasms, Severe nausea, Seizures, Another chronic medical condition which is severe and for which other treatments have been ineffective.”

Massachusetts 

The following patient conditions qualify for medical marijuana: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Cancer, Crohn’s disease, Glaucoma, HIV or AIDS, Hepatitis C, Multiple Sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease; Other conditions as determined in writing by a qualifying patient’s physician.”

Michigan

The state follows the rule on medical marijuana for the following qualifying patient conditions: “Alzheimer’s disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Arthritis, Autism, Cachexia or wasting syndrome, Cancer, Cerebral palsy, Colitis, Chronic pain, Crohn’s disease, Glaucoma, HIV or AIDS, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Hepatitis C, Nail patella, Nausea, Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), Parkinson’s, Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), Rheumatoid arthritis, Seizures, Severe and persistent muscle spasms, Spinal cord injury, Tourette’s syndrome and Ulcerative colitis.”

 

Minnesota

Medical marijuana is allowed for the following patient conditions: “Age-related macular degeneration, Alzheimer’s disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Autism, Cancer/cachexia, Chronic pain, Chronic vocal or motor tic disorder, Crohn’s disease, Glaucoma, HIV/AIDS, Intractable pain, Post-traumatic stress disorder, Seizures, Severe and persistent muscle spasms, Sickle cell disease, Sleep apnea, Terminal illness, and Tourette’s Syndrome.”

Mississippi  

These patient conditions qualify for the use of medical marijuana: “Alzheimer’s disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Autism, Cachexia, Cancer, Chronic pain (refractory) Crohn’s disease, Diabetic/peripheral neuropathy, Dementia-related agitation, Glaucoma, Hepatitis, HIV/AIDS, Huntington’s disease, Muscular dystrophy, Nausea Parkinson’s disease, Post-traumatic stress disorder, Seizures, Severe and persistent muscle spasms, Sickle cell disease, Pastic quadriplegia, Spinal cord disease, and Ulcerative colitis.”

 

Missouri  

The following patient conditions qualify for medical marijuana: “Alzheimer’s disease (agitation related to), Any terminal illness, Autism, Cancer, Crohn’s disease, Chronic pain/neuropathy, Epilepsy, Glaucoma, Hepatitis C, HIV/AIDS or cachexia or wasting syndrome Huntington’s disease, IBS, Intractable migraines, Lou Gehrig’s disease, Multiple Sclerosis, Opioid substitution, Parkinson’s disease, PTSD or other “debilitating psychiatric disorders”; Tourette syndrome, Sickle cell anemia, Seizures; Any “other chronic, debilitating or other medical condition” that may be alleviated by marijuana “in the professional judgment of a physician.”
 

Montana

The state follows the statute on medical marijuana for the following qualifying patient conditions: “Admittance into hospice care in accordance with rules adopted by the department; Cachexia or wasting syndrome, Cancer, Central nervous system disorder resulting in chronic, painful spasticity or muscle spasms, Crohn’s disease, Epilepsy or an intractable seizure disorder, Glaucoma, HIV/AIDS, Intractable nausea or vomiting, Painful peripheral neuropathy, Post traumatic stress disorder, Severe chronic pain that is persistent pain of severe intensity that significantly interferes with daily activities as documented by the patient’s treating physician

 

Nebraska

There are currently no rules on legality of medical marijuana in the state.

Nevada

Medical marijuana is allowed for these qualifying patient conditions: “Anorexia, Anxiety disorders, Autism spectrum disorders, Autoimmune disorders, AIDS / HIV, Cachexia, Cancer, Chronic pain, Glaucoma, Opioid dependency, Muscle spasms or seizures, Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), Neuropathic conditions (whether or not the condition causes seizures), Severe nausea or pain, Other conditions are subject to approval.”

New Hampshire

The state defines these qualifying patient conditions for medical marijuana: ALS, Alzheimer’s disease, Autism, Cachexia, Cancer, Chemotherapy induced anorexia, Chronic Pain, Chronic pancreatitis, Crohn’s disease, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Elevated intraocular pressure, Epilepsy, Glaucoma, Hepatitis C (currently receiving antiviral treatment), HIV/AIDS, Insomnia, Lupus, Moderate to severe vomiting, Multiple Sclerosis, Muscular Dystrophy, Nausea, Opioid use disorder, Parkinson’s disease, Persistent muscle spasms, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Seizures, Severe pain (that has not responded to previously prescribed medication); Spinal cord injury or disease, Traumatic brain injury, and Wasting syndrome.”

 

New Jersey The statute delineates the use of medical marijuana for the following patient conditions: “Addiction substitute therapy for opioid reduction, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Anxiety, Cancer (includes associated chronic pain and/or severe nausea), Chronic pain, Chronic visceral pain, Crohn’s disease, Dysmenorrhea (menstrual cramps), Epilepsy, Glaucoma, HIV/AIDS (includes associated chronic pain and/or severe nausea), Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), Migraines, Multiple Sclerosis, Muscular Dystrophy, Opioid dependency, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Seizure and/or spasticity disorders, Tourette’s syndrome, and any terminal illness if a doctor has determined the patient will die within a year.”

 

New Mexico

The law defines that the following patient conditions qualify for medical marijuana: “Alzheimer’s disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s disease), Anorexia/cachexia, Autism spectrum disorder, Cancer, Cervical dystonia, Crohn’s disease, Epilepsy and other seizure disorders, Friedreich’s ataxia, Glaucoma, Hepatitis C infection, HIV/AIDS, Hospice patients, Huntington’s disease, Inflammatory autoimmune-mediated arthritis, Intractable nausea/vomiting, Lewy body disease, Multiple sclerosis, Obstructive sleep apnea, Opioid dependency or other substance abuse disorders, Painful peripheral neuropathy, Parkinson’s disease, Post-traumatic Stress Disorder, Severe chronic pain, Spasmodic torticollis, Spinal cord damage, Spinal muscular atrophy, and Ulcerative colitis.”

 

New York 

The law states that medical marijuana can be consumed under these patient conditions: “Acute pain management, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Cancer, Chronic pain, Epilepsy, HIV/AIDS, Huntington’s Disease, Inflammatory bowel disease, Parkinson’s Disease, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Multiple Sclerosis, Neuropathies, Opioid substitution, Spinal cord damage, **Any other condition that the practitioner believes can be treated with medical cannabis (as of January 2022).

North Carolina 

The state allows the use of medical marijuana in the case of: “Intractable epilepsy, meaning a seizure disorder that, as determined by a neurologist, does not respond to three or more treatment options overseen by the neurologist.”

 

North Dakota 

These qualifying patient conditions are stipulated in the state law for medical marijuana: “Agitation from Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Anorexia nervosa, Anxiety disorder, Autism spectrum disorder, Brain injury, Bulimia nervosa, Cachexia or Wasting syndrome, Cancer, Chronic or debilitating disease, Crohn’s disease, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Endometriosis, Epilepsy, Fibromyalgia, Glaucoma, Hepatitis C, HIV/AIDS, Interstitial cystitis, Intractable nausea, Neuropathy, Migraine, Multiple sclerosis, Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), Rheumatoid arthritis, Seizures, Severe and persistent muscle spasms, Severe debilitating pain, Spinal stenosis, and Tourette syndrome.”

Ohio

Medical marijuana is allowed for these qualifying patient conditions: “Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), Alzheimer’s disease, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s disease), Arthritis, Cachexia, Cancer, Chronic migraines, Chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Complex regional pain syndrome, Crohn’s disease, Epilepsy or other seizure disorders, Fibromyalgia, Glaucoma, Hepatitis C, Huntington’s disease, Inflammatory bowel disease, Multiple Sclerosis, Pain that is either of the following nature: (i) Chronic and severe; or (ii) Intractable; Parkinson’s disease, Positive status for HIV, Post-traumatic stress disorder, Sickle cell anemia, Spasticity, Spinal cord disease or injury, Terminal illness, Tourette’s syndrome, Traumatic brain injury, and Ulcerative colitis.”

Oklahoma  

There are no qualifying conditions. All applications for a medical license must be signed by a registered Oklahoma Board-certified physician.

 

Oregon  

The state rule listed the following patient conditions for medical marijuana: “Alzheimer’s disease, Cachexia, Cancer, Chronic pain, Glaucoma, HIV or AIDS, Nausea, Persistent muscle spasms, Post-traumatic stress, Seizures, Other conditions are subject to approval.”

 

Pennsylvania 

The law stipulates medical marijuana for these qualifying patient conditions: “ALS (Lou Gehrig’s disease), Anxiety disorders, Autism, Cancer, including remission therapy, Crohn’s disease; Damage to the nervous tissue of the central nervous system (brain-spinal cord) with objective neurological indication of intractable spasticity and other associated neuropathies; Dyskinetic/spastic movement disorders, Epilepsy, Glaucoma, HIV/AIDS, Huntington’s disease, Inflammatory bowel disease, Intractable seizures, Intractable spasticity, Multiple Sclerosis, Opioid dependency, Neurodegenerative disorders, Neuropathies, Parkinson’s disease, Post-traumatic stress disorder, Sickle cell anemia, Severe chronic or intractable pain, Terminal illness (defined as 12 months or fewer to live); Tourette syndrome and other conditions that are recommended by the advisory board and approved by the secretary.”

 

Rhode Island  

The state regulation outlines the use of medical marijuana for the following patient conditions: “Alzheimer’s Disease, Autism, Cachexia, Cancer, Chronic pain, Crohn’s disease, Glaucoma, Hepatitis C, HIV/AIDS, Nausea, Persistent muscle spasms, Post traumatic stress disorder, Seizures, and Other conditions subject to approval.”

 

South Carolina 

The state rule on medical marijuana specifies these patient conditions: “Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome, Dravet Syndrome, also known as severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy, or any other form of refractory epilepsy that is not adequately treated by traditional medical therapies; cancer, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy and other neurological disorders, glaucoma, Crohn’s disease, sickle cell anemia, ulcerative colitis, cachexia or wasting syndrome, autism, nausea in homebound or end-of-life patients, muscle spasms and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) provided a patient can establish they experienced one or more traumatic events. Patients diagnosed with less than one year to live could also qualify.

South Dakota 

The law states that medical marijuana can be taken under the following patient conditions: “AIDS/HIV, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Multiple sclerosis, Cancer associated with severe or chronic pain, nausea or severe vomiting, or cachexia or severe wasting, Crohn’s disease, Epilepsy and seizures, Glaucoma, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), and Other medical condition or its treatment may be added by the Department of Health.

Tennessee  

The state law grants the use of medical marijuana under the following patient conditions: “Intractable seizures, Alzheimer’s disease, ALS, Cancer, Recalcitrant nausea and vomiting, Inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn’s disease, Ulcerative colitis, Epilepsy or seizure, Multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), and Sickle cell disease.”

 

Texas  

The statute provides the legality of medical marijuana under the following patient conditions: “Autism, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Cancer, Incurable neurodegenerative disorders, Intractable Epilepsy, Multiple sclerosis, Post-traumatic stress, Seizure disorders, and Terminal cancer.”

Utah  

It is specified under the state law for medical marijuana that the qualifying patient conditions include: “Intractable epilepsy, and Terminally ill patients (Under legislation signed in 2018, a patient diagnosed with no more than six months to live may access cannabis-infused products produced by a state-licensed provider.)”

 

Vermont  

This list of qualifying patient conditions is stipulated in the state law for medical marijuana: “Any patient receiving hospice care; Cachexia or wasting syndrome, cancer, Crohn’s disease, Glaucoma, HIV or AIDS, Multiple Sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, PTSD Seizures, Severe or chronic pain, severe nausea.

Virginia

The law stipulates medical marijuana use for any diagnosed condition or disease determined by the practitioner to benefit from such use.

 

Washington  

These qualifying patient conditions are specified in the state law for medical marijuana: “Cachexia, Cancer, Crohn’s disease, Glaucoma, Hepatitis C, HIV or AIDS, Intractable pain, Persistent muscle spasms, and/or spasticity, Nausea, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Seizures, Traumatic Brain Injury, or any “terminal or debilitating condition”.”
 

West Virginia

The statute delineates the use of medical marijuana for the following patient conditions: “Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Cancer, Crohn’s disease, HIV/AIDS, Epilepsy, Huntington’s disease, Intractable seizures, Multiple sclerosis, Neuropathies (chronic nerve pain), Parkinson’s disease, Post-traumatic stress disorder, Severe chronic or intractable pain, Spinal cord damage, Sickle cell anemia, and Terminal illness.”

Wisconsin  

There are currently no rules on legality of medical marijuana in the state.

Wyoming  

The law lists only one qualifying condition: “Intractable epilepsy (defined as epilepsy that “does not respond to other treatment options.”